brokelyn

37 notes

theawl:

wearethe47percent:

$20k in debt after associates’ degree in holistic healing. Can barely afford to keep basics in fridge. Haven’t gotten new glasses in years. Where my government @?
WE ARE THE 47 PERCENT!

Would sex him.

theawl:

wearethe47percent:

$20k in debt after associates’ degree in holistic healing. Can barely afford to keep basics in fridge. Haven’t gotten new glasses in years. Where my government @?

WE ARE THE 47 PERCENT!

Would sex him.

4 notes

Drunk Skeletor says: "These are the 18 best dive bars in Brooklyn"

A dive bar is a place that should have cheap beer, yes, but also decent service and some sense of being permanently etched into the landscape. If it’s baffling or intimidating to newcomers, all the better. If you walk into a bar, sit down with your beer and are suddenly being lectured on the terrible decision the Rangers made to trade for goddamn Phil Esposito 40 years ago, you know you’re in the right place. Or at least I know I am. A dive bar, more than any other kind of bar, is a place that acts as a bulwark against a world that is more often completely shitty than anything else.

Read the whole list here.

Filed under brokelyn brooklyn dive bars

29 notes

About last night.

WORD NERD FIGHT CLUB!!

jamiatt:

So I want to talk for a second about what happened last night at the Vol 1. Brooklyn reading at CultureFix, and the fight that ensued, an act shocking at the very least because we are all such sedentary creatures, we book people.

So CultureFix, a bar/gallery space I have never been to before and…

Filed under brooklyn brokelyn

5 notes

All hail the Cheapest Generation

cheapest generation

Economic recovery is based on how many things we buy, big things too, like DVD box sets and cars and houses and second cars. And here we sit, us generation Y or millennials or whatever, shaking our heads and asking “who the hell cares?” We are, as The Atlantic dubs us in this September article posted today, The Cheapest Generation, those of us wandering through urban areas, whose Zip Car spacephone apps are more important than owning a car, those of us for whom the dream of home ownership seems about as attractive as owning a diabetic elephant, who have, essentially, given up on the idea of “stuff.” And, according to The Atlantic, that means our country’s economy is boned. But that also means our generation is going to be just fine in the long run, and that should be OK with you.

Read the rest in today’s Brokelyn.

Filed under brokelyn cheapest generation brooklyn millennials generation y the atlantic